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STOP SMOKING FOR GOOD With Prescription Medication

Stop Smoking With Prescriptions  

 Why suffer needlessly?

 

 

To "turbo boost" your prescription meds, combine them with a behavioral-based support program like this one.

"...a combination of behavioral counseling & pharmacological treatment can boost success up to 10 times." - U.S. Surgeon General

If you're considering stopping smoking, there are a number of options available to you. Your doctor can help you choose the best prescription medications to help you to stop smoking.

There are two drugs in capsule and tablet form commonly prescribed for smoking cessation: Varenicline and Bupropion.

Varenicline (trade name Chantix in the USA and Champix in Canada, Europe and other countries) is a popular choice. Varenicline comes in capsule form and has been shown to be effective when used as a part of a program to help you stop smoking. Varenicline is reported to reduce nicotine cravings, prevent withdrawal symptoms and decrease its pleasurable effects.

However effective, there have been a number of serious psychiatric symptoms associated with the use of this drug and your doctor will advise you of the side-effects associated with Chantix and Champix - so you'll know if it's right for you. Wikipedia reports a 23% success rate for Varenicline after one year, when used alone. 2013 Update - Canadian class-action suit brought against Champix.

Bupropion (trade name Zyban and Wellbutrin) is the other popular medication commonly prescribed to help you stop smoking. Bupropion comes in tablet form and is an antidepressant. As often associated with other antidepressants, Zyban and Wellbutrin can lower the seizure threshold and is not recommended for everyone. Bupropion is reported to reduce cravings and withdrawal symptoms. Your doctor will advise you if it's right for you. Wikipedia reports a 15% success rate for Bupropion after one year, when used alone.

Now You Can Do It!

Other Options

Prescription help to stop smoking also comes in the forms of nasal spray and inhaler.

Available since 1996, the nicotine based nasal spray (Nicotrol) is gaining popularity. A fine mist of spray is quickly absorbed through the nasal passages, providing a "hit" of nicotine on a regular schedule. Like other Nicotine Replacement Therapies, you shouldn't smoke (or use other nicotine products) while using the nasal spray and it is designed to be a part of an overall cessation program. It is more powerful than gum or patches as it hits the bloodstream faster. A 40mg dose of nicotine taken at one time can be fatal, so smokers are warned not to inhale the product more than five times a day. It's recommended that the spray be used for up to 3 months - and no longer than 6 months. For best results, always combine NRTs with a support program. Your doctor can tell you more about the nicotine nasal spray. In a 750-patient study, the Mayo Clinic found a 25% success rate amongst spray users.

The stop smoking inhaler (Nicotrol) is also an NRT. A quick puff on the inhaler, provides an instant shot of nicotine, to help wean you gradually. The Habitrol Inhaler looks like a fat, plastic cigarette and provides hand to mouth behavior. Like the nasal spray above, you can use the nicotine inhaler on a regular schedule, for 3 months - and no longer than 6 months. Again, like other Nicotine Replacement Therapies, you shouldn't smoke (or use other nicotine products) while using the nasal spray and it is designed to be a part of an overall cessation program. For best results, always combine NRTs with a support program. Your doctor can tell you more about the nicotine inhaler.

For more details on the nasal spray and inhaler, visit Drugs.com

Now You Can Do It!

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Health Canada Quit Smoking Info    CDC Smoking and Tobacco Use   Surgeon General Tobacco Cessation - 
You Can Quit Smoking Now!    British NHS Stop Smoking Info

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